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Christian Louboutin Fall 2011 Lookbook by Peter Lippmann

Les Promises De L’hiverChristian Louboutin collaborates with Peter Lippmann for a series of images juxtaposing the shoe label’s fall-winter collection with portraits inspired by classic paintings. From Georges de la Tour’s “Magdalene and the Flame” to Jean-Marc Nattier portraits, the images pay homage to art masterpieces with a contemporary twist.








images courtesy of Christian Louboutin

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25 Comments

  1. Aaron

    June 20, 2011 at 9:54 pm

    Brilliant! Love the concept and the execution is flawless.

  2. Chantelle B.

    June 21, 2011 at 2:32 am

    Wow – these are incredible! They look like paintings, and yet they look so real that they do also look like photographs. The lighting’s amazing, the color palets are extraordinary as well. I am absolutely in love and am fascinated by all of the photos after the fourth picture after the break – so surreal. 

  3. LL

    June 21, 2011 at 3:08 am

    wonderful, wonderful! This is such an amazing technique! I can’t choose a favorite because I love them all!

  4. Timothy

    June 21, 2011 at 4:31 am

    These really are beautiful, with such perfect execution to look like paintings.  I don’t think I’ve ever seen anything like them (or at least as perfectly done).  The shoes do get upstaged, though.

  5. Camelia Tsubaki

    June 21, 2011 at 5:02 am

    Too much photoshop… but I suppose there’s no other way to achieve this level of perfection. 

  6. Camelia Tsubaki

    June 21, 2011 at 5:02 am

    Too much photoshop… but I suppose there’s no other way to achieve this level of perfection. 

  7. Elena Vasilieva

    June 21, 2011 at 7:55 am

    like it, it’s definitely different

    http://elenavasilieva.blogspot.com/

  8. Elena Vasilieva

    June 21, 2011 at 7:55 am

    like it, it’s definitely different

    http://elenavasilieva.blogspot.com/

  9. Elena Vasilieva

    June 21, 2011 at 7:55 am

    like it, it’s definitely different

    http://elenavasilieva.blogspot.com/

  10. Mila

    June 21, 2011 at 9:20 am

    Love it! Great idea!

    http://www.modeuncover.com

  11. Mila

    June 21, 2011 at 9:20 am

    Love it! Great idea!

    http://www.modeuncover.com

  12. Fromcaliwlove

    June 21, 2011 at 9:31 am

    Wow! Amazing! I had never seen anything like this before. Great idea!

  13. Fromcaliwlove

    June 21, 2011 at 9:31 am

    Wow! Amazing! I had never seen anything like this before. Great idea!

  14. T.

    June 21, 2011 at 12:24 pm

    What a great lookbook and concept, perfection!

  15. T.

    June 21, 2011 at 12:24 pm

    What a great lookbook and concept, perfection!

  16. T.

    June 21, 2011 at 12:24 pm

    What a great lookbook and concept, perfection!

  17. john

    June 22, 2011 at 1:26 am

    F‘cking Genious

  18. Raeshelle Wilson

    June 23, 2011 at 7:24 pm

    ahahha! oh, this makes me smile! how genius! so awesome!!
    positively, raeshelle!

  19. Raeshelle Wilson

    June 23, 2011 at 7:24 pm

    ahahha! oh, this makes me smile! how genius! so awesome!!
    positively, raeshelle!

  20. Muffintoppp

    July 2, 2011 at 1:47 am

    I love this!! This is GENIUS!!!

  21. sugarintheplum

    August 9, 2011 at 8:06 pm

    Louboutin’s Emancipated Breast: AFRICA IS A COUNTRY http://t.co/6VaCll5

    I should be happy that it’s not only white women who are represented in Louboutin’s spread.
    But the take on Marie-Guilleme Benoit’s “Portrait d’une Negresse”, where (you guessed it) a seated young, black woman poses for the painter, an exposed breast slipping out of Grecian folds of cloth. People like to argue that because this portrait was painted six years after slavery was abolished, and because the painter is a woman, it is an iconic image of emancipation: for black people as well as for women. We’re supposed to see “The Negresse” as an embodiment of steely determination and femininity (one would have to steel oneself, if one was asked to pose in a compromised manner by a white painter, a handful of years after the legal end of slavery). And the fact that the painting was acquired by Louis XVIII ’for France’ in 1818 may tell you something interesting, too.

    I don’t know about you, but I wouldn’t need to expose a boob in order to celebrate my emancipation form forced labour. Looks more like Benoit’s exploring and exploiting a well-known trope: desire and revulsion projected onto the Dark Other.

    Black Hamlets and White Othellos are now passé, so Alex Wek could have posed in any of these other ‘looks’. Of all the possible paintings that the artistic director of Louboutin’s Fall Lookbook could have picked, one in which a black model could pose, why pick the one with the liberated breast?

  22. sugarintheplum

    August 9, 2011 at 8:06 pm

    Louboutin’s Emancipated Breast: AFRICA IS A COUNTRY http://t.co/6VaCll5

    I should be happy that it’s not only white women who are represented in Louboutin’s spread.
    But the take on Marie-Guilleme Benoit’s “Portrait d’une Negresse”, where (you guessed it) a seated young, black woman poses for the painter, an exposed breast slipping out of Grecian folds of cloth. People like to argue that because this portrait was painted six years after slavery was abolished, and because the painter is a woman, it is an iconic image of emancipation: for black people as well as for women. We’re supposed to see “The Negresse” as an embodiment of steely determination and femininity (one would have to steel oneself, if one was asked to pose in a compromised manner by a white painter, a handful of years after the legal end of slavery). And the fact that the painting was acquired by Louis XVIII ’for France’ in 1818 may tell you something interesting, too.

    I don’t know about you, but I wouldn’t need to expose a boob in order to celebrate my emancipation form forced labour. Looks more like Benoit’s exploring and exploiting a well-known trope: desire and revulsion projected onto the Dark Other.

    Black Hamlets and White Othellos are now passé, so Alex Wek could have posed in any of these other ‘looks’. Of all the possible paintings that the artistic director of Louboutin’s Fall Lookbook could have picked, one in which a black model could pose, why pick the one with the liberated breast?

  23. sugarintheplum

    August 9, 2011 at 8:06 pm

    Louboutin’s Emancipated Breast: AFRICA IS A COUNTRY http://t.co/6VaCll5

    I should be happy that it’s not only white women who are represented in Louboutin’s spread.
    But the take on Marie-Guilleme Benoit’s “Portrait d’une Negresse”, where (you guessed it) a seated young, black woman poses for the painter, an exposed breast slipping out of Grecian folds of cloth. People like to argue that because this portrait was painted six years after slavery was abolished, and because the painter is a woman, it is an iconic image of emancipation: for black people as well as for women. We’re supposed to see “The Negresse” as an embodiment of steely determination and femininity (one would have to steel oneself, if one was asked to pose in a compromised manner by a white painter, a handful of years after the legal end of slavery). And the fact that the painting was acquired by Louis XVIII ’for France’ in 1818 may tell you something interesting, too.

    I don’t know about you, but I wouldn’t need to expose a boob in order to celebrate my emancipation form forced labour. Looks more like Benoit’s exploring and exploiting a well-known trope: desire and revulsion projected onto the Dark Other.

    Black Hamlets and White Othellos are now passé, so Alex Wek could have posed in any of these other ‘looks’. Of all the possible paintings that the artistic director of Louboutin’s Fall Lookbook could have picked, one in which a black model could pose, why pick the one with the liberated breast?

  24. sugarintheplum

    August 9, 2011 at 8:06 pm

    Louboutin’s Emancipated Breast: AFRICA IS A COUNTRY http://t.co/6VaCll5

    I should be happy that it’s not only white women who are represented in Louboutin’s spread.
    But the take on Marie-Guilleme Benoit’s “Portrait d’une Negresse”, where (you guessed it) a seated young, black woman poses for the painter, an exposed breast slipping out of Grecian folds of cloth. People like to argue that because this portrait was painted six years after slavery was abolished, and because the painter is a woman, it is an iconic image of emancipation: for black people as well as for women. We’re supposed to see “The Negresse” as an embodiment of steely determination and femininity (one would have to steel oneself, if one was asked to pose in a compromised manner by a white painter, a handful of years after the legal end of slavery). And the fact that the painting was acquired by Louis XVIII ’for France’ in 1818 may tell you something interesting, too.

    I don’t know about you, but I wouldn’t need to expose a boob in order to celebrate my emancipation form forced labour. Looks more like Benoit’s exploring and exploiting a well-known trope: desire and revulsion projected onto the Dark Other.

    Black Hamlets and White Othellos are now passé, so Alex Wek could have posed in any of these other ‘looks’. Of all the possible paintings that the artistic director of Louboutin’s Fall Lookbook could have picked, one in which a black model could pose, why pick the one with the liberated breast?

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